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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
the c-span will read my tweak is they do not contain any reference to canada's. -- cannabis. my question to you is whether or not where marijuana it's an overall drug trade? guest: there is a robust debate going on in this country today about where precisely we draw the line, which substances are controlled and which are not. i will tell you that the marijuana trade is the economic engine of a mexican drug trafficking, and there are thousands of people who have been murdered, who at suffered needlessly because of the violence that is associated with the marijuana trade its toll. -- itself. the argument that is typically advanced is that if we could legalize marijuana and took the profit out of it, when we make all the problems go away? the answer to that question is a resounding no. the people engaged in the trade will not just off the residence and go back into corporate life. but they are career criminals. we will fight them whether it is over the marijuana trade or something else. host: 10 has this point. the product value would be destroyed overnight. the economy cannot afford a blac
composed of the united states, sweden, norway, denmark, and canada who would care? what would be the point? the whole point of those bodies is to confront those countries whose behavior is problematic. you have to have the human rights violators in the human rights council, otherwise, there is no point. i think that is with the idea of some standards for performance should come in for who gets to sit on what body at the u.n. host: the united nations came into existence in 1945. the current secretary general of the u.n. is -- albert on our republican line, go ahead. obama: why haven't the administration pulled the plug on colonialism? he had a shot to do his legacy in foreign policy but he has not spoken out against colonialism? could you explain that to me? guest: there is not much of it left. there are few countries left in the world under colonialism. he has talked to the united nations about the need to find new ways of cooperation against transnational cooperative the threats. i think his argument at the united nations has been -- has been pretty compelling. his argument at the un, i t
with very diseases. a clinic and ontario, canada, has already created over 130 lines for 11 diseases. this clinic is also working on making lines to address diseases such as autism, schizophrenia. if there are additional funds, congress should invest in this type of a ground-breaking research. supporters of the embryonic research would like to ignore such accomplishments. they would suggest that providing federal taxpayer dollars on its embryonic stem cell research is the only means of getting results. however the accomplishment among adults -- it proves otherwise. i am proud to say that for a decade and a half, this amendment has protected life. this debate involves profound ethical, and moral questions. this is a matter of conscience for me, but more importantly, it is a matter of conscience for millions of americans who are deeply troubled by the idea that there taxpayer dollars may be used to destroy another human life. when there are other proven techniques available. i want to thank you very much for your time and i appreciate the opportunity to testify. >> senator weicker, tha
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)